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The dark forest /

"With the scope of Dune and the rousing action of Independence Day, this near-future trilogy is the first chance for English-speaking readers to experience this multple-award-winning phenemonenon from China's most beloved science fiction author. In Dark Forest, Earth is reeling from the... Full description

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Other Authors: Martinsen, Joel.
Format: Book
Language: English
Chinese
Published: Tor Books, 2015
Edition: First U.S. edition.
Series: Three-Body Trilogy ; Book II
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SUMMARY

This near-future trilogy is the first chance for English-speaking readers to experience this multiple-award-winning phenomenon from Cixin Liu, China's most beloved science fiction author.

In The Dark Forest , Earth is reeling from the revelation of a coming alien invasion-in just four centuries' time. The aliens' human collaborators may have been defeated, but the presence of the sophons, the subatomic particles that allow Trisolaris instant access to all human information, means that Earth's defense plans are totally exposed to the enemy. Only the human mind remains a secret. This is the motivation for the Wallfacer Project, a daring plan that grants four men enormous resources to design secret strategies, hidden through deceit and misdirection from Earth and Trisolaris alike. Three of the Wallfacers are influential statesmen and scientists, but the fourth is a total unknown. Luo Ji, an unambitious Chinese astronomer and sociologist, is baffled by his new status. All he knows is that he's the one Wallfacer that Trisolaris wants dead.

The Remembrance of Earth's Past Trilogy
The Three-Body Problem
The Dark Forest
Death's End

Other Books
Ball Lightning (forthcoming)


Review by Booklist Review

In 2014, Chinese star author Cixin Liu's The Three Body Problem came to the Western world with a fresh coat of English and a smartly imaginative and surreal first-contact story to tell. Now its sequel continues the tale of international alien intrigue as the extraterrestrial Trisolarans, a telepathic race incapable of deception, attempt to understand humanity, which knows deception to be its only advantage should the visitors turn out to be hostile. With this central conceit, Liu proves that The Three Body Problem only showcased a portion of his delightfully and powerfully clever imagination. The book's large cast of characters form a latticework of precisely placed focal points around which the story weaves and connects to wonderful moments of revelation. Readers of the prequel may feel the lack of extended, surrealistically dream-like scenes, and all readers will likely note this new installment's rather graceless exposition-dumps for uninformed newcomers to the series, but the macroscopic power of Liu's writing assures that The Dark Forest is worthy of its predecessor.--Francis, Chris Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

Readers who haven't read (or haven't recently reread) 2014's The Three-Body Problem will feel disoriented at the outset of this sprawling hard SF novel. In the prologue, an ant and a spider overhear Dr. Ye Wenjie, an astrophysicist, suggest to astronomer-turned-sociologist Luo Ji that there are "axioms of cosmic civilization," a neat variation on Asimov's psychohistory. This scene epitomizes the book's biggest flaw: clever ideas lost in often didactic prose. Before the notion of a cosmic sociology can be further developed, Liu shifts gears to present a dialogue between an alien intelligence, the Trisolaris, and the leader of the Earth-Trisolaris Organization, about the distinction between thought and speech. The Trisolarians pose a significant threat to humankind, which triggers very different responses on Earth, ranging from the Escapists, who believe that flight is the only option, to the formation of a Planetary Defense Council. The upbeat ending sets up the concluding volume, but not everyone will have the patience needed to get that far. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
AUTHOR NOTES

Cixin Liu is the author of The Three Body Problem, which won Best Novel at the Hugo Awards 2015.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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