Buffalo and Erie County Public Library

!!To protect your privacy, please remember to log out when you are finished. The Log Out button is at the top of the page.!!

The man who kept his heart in a bucket /

Having once had his heart broken, Jack keeps it in a bucket safe from harm until one day a young maiden asks him to solve a riddle which teaches him the true meaning of love. Full description

Main Author:
Other Authors: Pinkney, Jerry,
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: Dial Books for Young Readers, 1991
Edition: First edition.
Subjects:
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
View on New Catalog
Cover Image
Saved in:
SUMMARY

Having once had his heart broken, Jack keeps it in a bucket safe from harm until one day a young maiden asks him to solve a riddle which teaches him the true meaning of love.


Review by Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. The bold watercolors that sweep across the pages of this picture book demand a strong story line. Levitin delivers a respectable one, blending familiar folk- and fairy-tale conventions into a sentimental tale of yore about a passionless tinsmith, who keeps his heart "safe" in a bucket so it cannot be broken. One day, while refreshing his heart in the water of a stream, the young man encounters a golden carp. Leaping from the water, the fish turns into a lovely maiden who steals the precious heart and runs away, challenging the tinsmith to solve a riddle in order to regain it. Subtle at the outset, the tale becomes more surefooted as the solution to the riddle is sought. The pull of Pinkney's art, however, remains constant. Each character is expressively rendered, and the paper, buff colored like an old tintype, vibrates with splashes of color and intriguing period detail. (Reviewed Sept. 1, 1991)0803710291Stephanie Zvirin

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

A lad whose heart was once broken now keeps it safe from harm; PW noted the ``eloquent, fluid'' prose and ``dreamy, evocative watercolors'' of this ``thoroughly captivating story.'' Ages 4-8. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Review by School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5-- Young Jack, the village tinker, can keep his mind on his busines of making pots and pans as long as he carries his heart--once broken--in a bucket. Of course, he feels no delight in tasting the baker's finest pie, or hearing the piper's music, or hugging a new baby at a farm. But when he stops for water, dipping his bucket into a stream, he loses his heart to a great carp that leaps into the air and becomes a beautiful maiden. She gives him a riddle in exchange: Jack will get his heart back when he finds three golden scales. By the time Jack accomplishes this, he knows that a heart is useless in a bucket. Levitin's cleverly created story, structured like a traditional folktale, is enhanced by Pinkney's watercolor and pencil scenes of ruddy-cheeked Eastern European peasants, thatched roof cottages, and lush green countryside. The moral of the story, that a heart should be in the right place, brings a touch of romance and a satisfying ending to the tale. --Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Similar Items